Category Archives: fishing

BP spill: One year since worst oil spill ever

[originally posted at PSLweb]

April 18, 2011

Deepwater Horizon explosion, April 20, 2010

The writer was part of a delegation that traveled to the Gulf at the onset of the crisis to meet with affected fishermen, workers and activists as part of the Seize BP campaign calling for the seizure of BP’s assets to pay for the cleanup and fully compensate economic losses of those in the region. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country at that time.

One year after causing the worst oil spill in history, BP has claimed 2010 as their “best year in safety performance” in their company’s history, even as workers in the Gulf region continue to suffer from the disaster.

Adding insult to injury, BP executives recently rewarded themselves with “safety bonuses.” BP’s CEO Steve Newman’s bonus last year was $374,062, which is really just a tip since Newman usually rakes in almost $6 million a year. Transocean managers—the owners of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig—received up to two-thirds of the total possible “safety” bonuses.

Role of capitalist state exposed

The explosion on the Deep Horizon off-shore rig 50 miles off the Louisiana coast left 11 workers dead, 17 injured and more than 200 million tons of oil in the Gulf of Mexico, wreaking untold damage on the environment and economies of the Gulf states. The aftermath of the profit-driven catastrophe showed the true power of big oil and exposed the government and state as managers of the interests of the capitalist class.

Millions of gallons of oil poured into the Gulf and hundreds of thousands of gallons of Corexit and other toxic dispersants—banned in 19 countries—were pumped in to conceal it. At the same time, the Obama administration approved dozens of off-shore drilling projects in the early days of the crisis, showing all the more in Obama’s own words that the federal government’s relationship to big oil is indeed “cozy.”

It took BP several attempts to cap the gusher, finally succeeding on July 15—nearly three months later.

CNN just received the “prestigious” Peabody Award for journalism for their comprehensive coverage of the disaster, acting as only one mouthpiece of the apparatus to echo BP’s efforts and the federal government’s endorsement.

BP headquarters in Houma, La., carefully released information on their efforts and promises to deal with the disaster—although the press or public could not walk into BP headquarters to verify that. Again, to show the relationship between big oil and the government, it was not BP’s private security at the gates of their operations headquaters in Louisiana. It was staffed by the Department of Homeland Security.

Michael Bromwich, head of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, is pressuring federal officials for $100 million, not to clean up the Gulf disaster or compensate workers and residents, but to speed up the infrastructure to approve more permits for drilling in the Gulf. Already in mid-March, Anglo-Suisse claimed responsibility for another oil spill, while yet more lip service was given to the need for “federal oversight.”

Workers, residents report chronic health effects

The working and oppressed people of Gulf have another story to tell. Exemplified in one man’s story who lives 100 miles from the coast, a recent report showed that he tested as having higher levels of chemicals from BP’s spill than actual clean-up workers.

Hundreds of thousands of gallons of toxic dispersants were pumped into the Gulf at the time.

The health problems resulting from the spill continue to become apparent while peoples’ pleas for medical care to address the toxic health affects of the spill continue to be ignored by BP and government authorities.

Many of the clean-up workers were fishermen and others who became unemployed during the disaster. These workers lived under appalling conditions and became exposed to toxic oil and chemicals.

“If I wanted to be in prison, I would break the law and go to jail,” explained one clean-up worker when asked to describe the living conditions of the “floating hotels” set-up by BP.

At one point, these workers carried out a strike to demand better housing. Most of them are still waiting for compensation for their claims from BP.

Major health problems are being seen among people exposed to both the oil and the dispersants used in the cleanup. According to Dr. Rodney Soto, a Florida physician, both the oil and the dispersants contain volatile organic compounds that cause an array of negative health problems. (Al-Jazeera)

According to Soto, between five and seven VOCs have been found in his patients who also report symptoms and illnesses including vomiting, kidney damage, lung damage, burning sensations in the nose and throat, skin irritation and liver damage.

Alabama resident Lloyd Pearcey worked on a BP clean-up team for four months. He has chemicals from oil and dispersants in his blood, according to tests conducted by Soto. Pearcey is now battling cancer.

Others who did not work in the cleanup currently have similar medical complications. Even more troubling, others with toxins present in their blood today may present symptoms or illnesses later as a result of the exposure.

As time goes on, there are potentially “tremendous implications in the human immune system, hormonal function, and brain function,” according to Soto.

Untold environmental damage

While BP reports that they have completed clean-up efforts in Mississippi, residents report a strange foamy substance washing up on shore that could very well be connected to dispersants used.

Yet the Environmental Protection Agency, the Food and Drug Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, state health departments and President Obama have joined the chorus with BP that the beaches and seafood from the Gulf are safe.

“It’s criminal for the government to tell people to eat the contaminated seafood, and that it’s alright for people go to our toxic beaches and swim in the contaminated water,” Dr. Soto said.

The environmental impact continues to be assessed with alarming statistics. One report showed that 60 percent of Louisiana coastal land erosion resulted from the spill. In reality, the extent of the erosion has not been fully calculated, but could be as much as the size of the state of Delaware.

The Gulf Coast shoreline is a fragile and complex ecological system—a system that protects the interior against hurricanes as well as providing a cycle of food for many different species. Thus, oil contamination on the coast kills off microscopic algae, a base food, cutting off nutrients to fish, shrimp, oysters and then larger species, such as birds, land animals and humans.

Toxic dispersants remain in the Gulf of Mexico. It is clear that this was a strategy not to clean up the spill, but to conceal it deep in the sea, impacting deep-sea wildlife for generations to come.

Oil from the BP spill remains stuck on the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico, according to marine scientist Samantha Joye of the University of Georgia. She presents evidence that the oil is not degrading as expected and is killing life on the sea floor.

Her videos and photographs taken deep below the surface show dead crabs, pale starfish and suffocated tube worms, which are all sea life key to the larger ecological cycle.

The sea life not only suffered from the oil itself; the fire that lasted for days produced a tremendous amount of methane and soot that ultimately will reach the marshes, beaches and barrier islands where other wildlife nest and breed in the Gulf.

No real compensation for the people of the Gulf

BP has assets of $152 billion. If British Petroleum were a nation it would rank 35th richest in the world, if its assets were calculated as gross national product. The Seize BP Campaign demanded that the assets of British Petroleum be seized by the government—the only entity that could carry out such an action.

These demands did not place faith in a government at the service of big oil, but demanded that the funds be placed into a trust that could quickly and easily assist the people of the Gulf and the clean-up efforts and be made available as more damages became uncovered.

This trust would have been administered by the people from the harmed area. The trustees were to include representatives of the fishers, shrimpers, crabbers, unions, small business people and workers in the tourism and recreation industry, local elected officials, clergy, and independent scientists and environmentalists.

Instead of full compensation for the people of the Gulf or the people of the Gulf having a say in their futures, Obama made Kenneth Feinberg trustee for distributing what BP was willing to pay. Feinberg was previously appointed to hand out the billions of taxpayers’ money in the bailout for the banks, insurance companies and their criminal executives. Feinberg holds the purse strings to the escrow fund rather than the people who are most impacted.

BP has been promoting the idea that the tourist industry in the Gulf was not affected by the disaster. In fact, many hotels were booked with clean-up workers and others working on the spill. Yet hotel and tourist industry representatives report that these visitors did not come to the Gulf to enjoy the beaches, eat in the restaurants and participate in one of the largest industries—sport fishing.

Just a month ago, local workers who assisted in the clean-up efforts and are suffering from poor health and other damages to their boats filed suit in New Orleans, naming BP and the other co-owners of Deepwater Horizon as well as the manufacturer of the toxic dispersants. The suit is seeking compensation for bodily harm and unpaid wages.

The White House announced a criminal investigation into BP, Transocean, the well operator contractor, and Halliburton, the second largest company in the world in oil field services, which cemented the rig. We know all too well what the result of a White House-led investigation will be—a slap on the wrist at best.

The oil giants’ drive for profits has resulted in theft of land from indigenous peoples in Louisiana to peoples of the Middle East, untold environmental havoc and millions of deaths from wars and occupations. The BP oil disaster has made all the more clear the need to continue to build a movement to eradicate the private ownership of the earth’s resources, so that the people of the planet can plan and safely extract needed resources without jeopardizing the poorest now and generations to come.

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Filed under class struggle, Corporations, Environment, Environmental Justice, fishing, Florida, Gulf Oil Spill, Gulf States, Louisiana, Oil

Environmental and economic crises spark new wave of activism in Louisiana

Tuesday, November 9, 2010
By: Gregory W. Esteven

[Originally posted to pslweb.org]

Project Gulf Impact forum provides glimmer of a new people’s movement

On October 10, Project Gulf Impact and Loyola University held an Oil Spill Forum on the Loyola campus in New Orleans.

The purpose of the forum was to allow coastal Louisiana community members to speak about their perspectives and experiences in the aftermath of the Gulf oil catastrophe. Panelists included a former director of an EPA-contracted laboratory, wives of fishermen and other workers, and activists who live along Louisiana’s coast and surrounding areas. In all, there were around a dozen speakers  and about 50 audience members.

The forum, which included videos, panel presentations, and a vibrant discussion period, had political importance beyond its turnout. It provided a view of an emerging social justice movement in the areas affected by the spill. Two prominent themes dominated the discussion period: sharp criticism of the U.S. government and corporations responsible, and the need for a reconstruction effort that meets the needs of poor and working people.

Scientists, community members and new activists speak out

Cheri Foytlin, an activist and a mother of six, described her attempts at dealing with the authorities since the oil spill: “The government wouldn’t listen to me because I’m nobody.”

Susan Felio Price, a Cajun woman born in the Louisiana bayous, said, “I have been waiting for Obama to do something—to save us. He hasn’t. … I believed in a system that I thought worked.” She went on to describe how she has been personally lied to by representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Navy and the Federal Department of Agriculture.

Kimberly Wolf, a former director of an EPA-contracted laboratory, perhaps expressed the sentiment most strongly, trembling with emotion as she spoke. “This government is willing to poison over 14 million people for profit. The U.S. government is not going to protect you. They are going to drop you on your heads…We have to be at war with our government. This is a war for the generations.” Similar messages were repeated throughout the forum and met with frequent applause.

Most of the panelists themselves had experienced medical conditions because of the spill, and to have witnessed the profound public health implications in the coastal communities. Noting the authorities’ lack of interest in this aspect of the oil spill, panelist Vicki Perrin said, “We see people getting sick. We talk to them.”

Perrin is a leader of Project Gulf Impact, which started out as a documentary film project and has transformed into a non-profit organization whose mission is to “document the economic, environmental and human health impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.”

Multiple panelists brought up the fact that people in the fishing communities have unexpectedly become activists in response to the oil spill. Working class leaders have emerged in the Louisiana coastal region, and they are beginning to get organized.

Several panelists emphasized the important role being played by women from these communities in the movement for social and environmental justice. All of the panelists, excluding two from Project Gulf Impact, were women.

One panelist, Lauren Goldfinch, is even known as the “accidental activist,” because, like others, she never envisioned herself doing this kind of work. Goldfinch explained how necessity pushed her to take action: “My homeland is being ravaged before my very eyes.” Undoubtedly, many others would share Goldfinch’s sentiment if they knew such a movement existed.

BP’s “gobbledygook” science

The forum exhibited profound mistrust about the supposedly “scientific” information being put out by the U.S. government, the mainstream media and major corporations. Attendees suggested a monumental campaign—bordering on conspiracy—has been launched to suppress the truth about the causes of the spill and its impacts.

Panelists argued that alternative media and scientific sources were required to get the real story about the environmental consequences of the spill.

Heather Rally, a veterinary medicine student who worked on the “Project Gulf Impact” documentary and has experience in marine mammal rehabilitation, called the level of misinformation “mind-blowing.” “The media and scientific community are bought and paid for by corporate dollars,” she explained, in reference to the scientists contracted by BP to “investigate” the spill. Their lack of transparency makes their findings dubious, and they do not adhere to the basic principles of scientific investigation.

Environmental scientist and panelist Lauren Goldfinch called BP’s data “gobbledygook.” She also said that the FDA is insufficiently sampling the entire coastal area when looking for signs of oil contamination. She maintained that they are only testing where oil is visible on the surface of the water. It is clear, however, that oil can be found at much lower depths, in large part because the application of chemical dispersants has caused the oil to sink. In addition, Goldfinch explained that authorities have adjusted the “danger” level for contamination, setting it three times higher than it had been before. This fosters the impression that the levels of contamination are much lower than they actually are.

Gavin Garrison, the director of the documentary project, asserted that the EPA has gone back and removed data from their website and that critical media articles have changed or removed from websites.

Some have taken the investigation into their own hands. Vicki Perrin, the vice president of the Coastal Heritage Society of Louisiana, stated that she and other activists have been testing rainwater for the presence of dangerous chemicals in the aftermath of the spill. She maintains that they have been finding dangerous levels of chemicals like copper, magnesium, chloride, nickel and aluminum in the rainwater. Some of these problems predate the Deepwater Horizon catastrophe as Louisiana has a long history of environmental degradation. Like economically impoverished areas elsewhere in the country and the world, it has been used as a dumping ground by the worst corporate polluters.

A regional history of underdevelopment

Louisiana is one of the richest states in terms of natural resources, but its residents remain some of the poorest in the country. Institutionalized racism and national oppression remain intense and seemingly intractable here. This is a legacy deeply rooted throughout the historic “Black Belt”—the geographic band that stretches across the southern United States in which slave populations were concentrated and the largest plantations dominated.

Before U.S. imperialism began its worldwide march to extract resources and expand its markets, it first had to extend its reign over its own territories. The South in particular became a virtual colony of Wall Street, which—like the “banana republics” of Central America—delivered raw materials, agricultural goods, and eventually cheap labor, while remaining far less developed economically.

The economic condition of Louisiana—along with much of the South—remains an especially powerful indictment of U.S. capitalism and its political institutions. Rather than provide the “American dream” of social mobility, chronic poverty, underdevelopment and extreme inequality have been the norm.

Louisiana’s historical experience continues to provide a deep well of resentment against the U.S. government, among different sectors of the local population. For some, this resentment has echoes of Huey Long populism, which electrified the state in the 1930s. For others, it takes the form of “state’s rights”—which has long been used as a slogan for the country’s most reactionary right-wing currents. The simple characterization of Louisiana as a mere hotbed of reaction, however, is misleading. These different strains often mix together in a complex, if contradictory, way. Understanding these contradictions will be necessary for activists who seek to build a revolutionary, class-conscious alternative in the South.

In the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and now the oil spill, criticism of the government has increased sharply in the state. Local activism has increased dramatically as well, even if the movements are still in early stages of development and often lack coordination.

The for-profit system has proven that it can only function with that purpose, and has been unable to respond to the multiple crises. Elites, both national and local, have demonstrated their unwillingness and inability to envision a reconstruction program that prioritizes the needs of poor and working people.

It is partly in this light that laissez-faire “libertarianism” has gained traction in Louisiana—as part of a general anti-government attitude. But if implemented, the libertarian program would allow the unrestrained rule of private corporations; it would make the region’s economic and natural disasters even worse.    

Among youth, on the other hand, there has been a striking interest in socialist and anarchist ideas. A recent nationwide Pew poll on capitalism-versus-socialism found that the millennial generation is essentially divided on the merits of each. While the poll did not include any meaningful details or definitions, it seems to be confirmed among the youth of Louisiana, who have not grown up in the era of Cold War anti-communism.

Since the Deepwater Horizon spill, many now refer to the corporate domination of society. There has been a noticeable shift in everyday conversation with workers and students, at protests and in public forums such as the one hosted by Project Gulf Impact.

While vast potential exists to build a vibrant social movement in Louisiana, we need strong working-class organizations and activists who are unafraid to talk about a new system, socialism.
Such organizations help provide coordination among disparate oppressed sectors, and give political direction during these difficult times of crisis. There is undoubtedly a rise in right-wing, racist extremism, and the Tea Party’s fake populism aims to channel the people’s righteous indignation in the wrong direction.
 
The multiple crises facing Louisiana will not spontaneously create the revolutionary change we need. Revolutionary organization, and tireless self-sacrificing fighters are required to show the people of this state that there is an alternative. If you’re one of those fighters—or you want to be—we invite you to join us.

The author is a life-long Louisiana resident and activist in Hammond, La.

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Filed under class struggle, Communism, Corporations, Environment, Environmental Justice, fishing, Gulf Oil Spill, Gulf States, Human Rights, Louisiana, National Oppression, Oil, Race, Southern Strategy, Southern United States, Uncategorized, United States, workers

Effect of Oil Spill on Native American Tribes

By hastenawait

As part of the SEIZE BP Campaign’s first national day of action, we staged a rally in the university town of Hammond, Louisiana, which is mid-way between New Orleans and Baton Rouge. When I was interviewed by NBC 33 out of Baton Rouge at this event, I predicted that some of the worst effects of the environmental crisis would be felt by the oppressed nationalities living in the coastal areas. I was thinking mainly about African American, Latino, and Indochinese workers (large numbers of Vietnamese and Cambodian immigrants, for instance, are involved in the fishing industry here). I was referring to a general pattern of environmental racism, with which we are familiar in Louisiana.

But the crisis in the Gulf is also hitting coastal tribal peoples, the remnants of those who have survived centuries of genocidal repression. Heather Benno, in a Party for Socialism and Liberation editorial, reports:

Native American tribes in southern Louisiana continue their struggle against Big Oil after decades of land destruction. The Choctaw, Chitimacha, Houma, Attakapas and Biloxi tribes, all native to the Gulf marshes, have seen the oil from the BP spill destroy their fishing grounds and livelihoods.

Emary Billiot, a Native American fisherman from the region, explained: “Once the oil gets in the marshes, it’s all over, that’s where your shrimp spawn. Then we’re in trouble.”

Oil’s assault on Native lands is nothing new.  In the early 19th century, the federal government claimed the land and sold it off to oil and land companies. Oil companies dug canals for private pipelines that ruined the marshes by saltwater seepage.The destruction from BP’s April rig explosion, coupled with decades of legal Native environmental and cultural devastation, shows that the oil industry, and the government that supports it, are the problem. A historian with the United Houma Nation tribe explained, “This is not a two-week story, but a hundred-year story.”

Then there is the Atakapa Ishak tribe of coastal Louisiana. Here is a moving video about their plight. These effects – brought about by a multinational corporation and the U.S. government – are nothing short of environmental racism, and are part of the continuing national oppression of North American tribal peoples, whose right to self-determination has been brutally undermined since the arrival of European conqueors.

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Filed under African Americans, ANSWER Coalition, Corporations, Environment, Environmental Justice, fishing, Gulf Oil Spill, Gulf States, Louisiana, National Oppression, Native Americans, Race, Southern United States, Uncategorized, United States, workers

Seize BP National Days of Action

The Seize BP campaign has called for more national days of action this week.  Some have happened and many more are planned for tomorrow (Saturday the 5h).  Many cities in the South are holding demonstrations (along with cities all over the country) to demand the seizure of BP’s assets.  The campaign was even mentioned on CNN recently.

The oil spill has now reached Florida and is likely going to continue to spread.

Below is a partial list of newly announced actions. Details for additional events are still coming in and being compiled, so check our website regularly for updates.

CALIFORNIA

Claremont, California
Thursday, June 10, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Arco station
701 E. Foothill Blvd (Corner of Foothill and Claremont Blvd)
Contact: Claudia Strauss, straussri@aol.com

Long Beach, California
Wednesday, June 9 at 4:30pm
Long Beach Aquarium, 100 Aquarium Way (Aquarium Way & Shoreline Drive)
The Aquarium, which claims its mission is “to instill a sense of wonder, respect, and stewardship for the Pacific Ocean, its inhabitants, and ecosystems” just took $1 million from oil criminals BP and unveiled a “BP Sea Otter Habitat.” This sickinging double-standard shows the utter bankruptcy of the Aquarium’s board of directors and attempts to provide cover for BP’s crimes.
Contact: 213-251-1025 or la@seizebp.org.
Click here for map and parking.

Los Angeles, California
Saturday, June 5 at 12 noon
Palisades Park at Ocean Ave. & Colorado Ave., Santa Monica (near the Santa Monica Pier)
Contact: 213-251-1025 or la@seizebp.org
Click here for a map.

Oceanside, California
Saturday, June 5 at 2 p.m.
Bp station, 160 Davison Ave
Bring signs and loud voices.
Contact: nfkut2001@gmail.com

San Francisco, California
Tuesday, June 8 at 5 p.m.
BP Offices
90 New Montgomery St. (near Mission St.)
Contact: 415-821-6545, sf@seizebp.org

Santa Cruz, California
Friday, June 4 at 2:30 p.m.
The Clock Tower
Contact: http://www.meetup.com/Seize-BP

CONNECTICUT

Milford, Connecticut
Saturday, June 5, 12 noon
BP Gas Station, 231 Cherry Street
Picket along the sidewalk in front of station. Bring signs or pictures. Only a few will be made by organizer.
Contact: megangrosso@yahoo.com or 203-556-9133 or Facebook page (click here)

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Washington, D.C.
Thursday, June 3 at 5 p.m.
BP Amoco Gov’t Affairs Office
1101 New York Ave., NW (on the north side of I St. b/w 11th & 12th Sts.)
Contact: 202-265-1949 or info@seizebp.org

FLORIDA

Destin, Florida
Saturday, June 5 at 1 p.m.
202 Harbor Boulevard – Ground zero for Okaloosa county

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Saturday, June 5 at 1 p.m.
South Fort Lauderdale Beach Park on A1A (Enter park just south of SE 5th Street) across from the Bahia Mar Hotel
Contact: 954-707-0155 or florida@seizebp.org
Click here for a map.

Orlando, Florida
Saturday, June 5, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Lake Eola Park (meet up at the corner of E Robinson St and N Eola Drive)
Street Meeting and Outreach Event
Contact: 321-437-4785 or florida@seizebp.org
Click here for a map.

Tallahassee, Florida
Saturday, June 5 at 11 a.m.
Old Capitol (corner of Apalachee Pkwy and Monroe St)
Contact: Florida State University Center for Participant Education at fsucpe@gmail.org (www.fsucpe.org)

Tampa, Florida
Saturday, June 5 at 3 p.m.
Corner of Bearss and N. Florida Ave.
Contact: jpegan@mail.usf.edu

GEORGIA

Atlanta, Georgia
Saturday, June 5 at 1 p.m.
BP Station, 350 Moreland Avenue
Arrive at the BP station with signs, posterboards, megaphones and demand that BP end this oil spill now and demand the government seize BP’s assets! Enough is enough!
Contact: Allyson Bowers, (404) 731-3941

HAWAII

Anahola / Kuhio, Hawaii
Saturday, June 5 at 12 noon
Anahola / Kuhio Highway – Meet at the Lei stand
Contact: Marcia McPhail at 808-640-5761

ILLINOIS

Chicago, Illinois
Thursday, June 3 at 5 p.m.
BP Offices in Chicago
Corner of Randolph & Michigan
Bring your signs, banners and voices of protest!
Contact: 773-463-0311

KENTUCKY

Louisville, Kentucky
Wednesday, June 2, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.
First Unitarian Church, 4th & York
Meeting for Louisville-area residents to discuss how they can respond to this overwhelming ecological catastrophe.

MARYLAND

Baltimore, Maryland
Saturday, June 5 at 1 p.m.
General Sam Smith Park (SE corner of Light St. and E. Pratt Street., by the flag pole nearby the Inner Harbor)
Visibility action
Contact: baltimore@seizebp.org

MASSACHUSETTS

Boston, Massachusetts
Friday, June 4 at 5 p.m.
Park St. T station
Visibility action
Contact: 857-334-5084 or boston@seizebp.org

MICHIGAN

St. Joseph, Michigan.
Wednesday, June 9 at 5 p.m.
BP gast station on the corner of Napier (2501 Niles Ave.)
Contact: jbounds1029@gmail.com

NEVADA

Las Vegas, Nevada
Sunday, June 6 at 10 a.m.
Flamingo and Maryland Parkway intersection.
Demonstration at one or more corners of the busy intersection. Bus stops there going all 4 directions. Will pass flyers to bus riders and pedestrians. Traffic flow should be busy.
Contact: David K. or Teri K. at 702-408-4819 or 408-5622 or pulbiz@aol.com – Please RSVP

NEW MEXICO

Albuquerque, New Mexico
Saturday, June 5 at 12 noon
Tulane at Central
Contact: 505-268-2488

NEW YORK

New York, New York
Thursday, June 3 at 5 p.m.
JP Morgan Chase World Headquarters*
270 Park Ave. (at 48th street)
*Chase owns close to 30 percent of BP’s public stock
Contact: 212-694-8720, nyc@seizebp.org

Syracuse, New York
Saturday, June 5 at 2 p.m.
ArtRage Gallery, 505 Hawley Ave.
Volunteer Meeting: “BP’s Gulf of Mexico Disaster: Who will pay the price?” Hear presentations about the case for seizure and find out how to get involved in the Seize BP campaign in Syracuse.
Contact: syracuse@seizebp.org

PENNSYLVANIA

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Wednesday, June 9 at 5 p.m.
Location to be announced.
Visibility action
Contact: philly@seizebp.org

TEXAS

Austin, Texas
Saturday, June 5, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Southeast corner of 6th and Lamar
Signs will be available.
Contact: austin@seizebp.org

Irving, Texas
Friday, June 4 at 12 noon
ExxonMobil Corporate Headquarters, 5959 Las Colinas Blvd
Click here for a map.

VIRGINIA

Front Royal, Virginia
Sunday, June 6, 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.
BP station on the corner of Hwy 522 and Hwy 55
Contact: lowendunlimited@yahoo.com

Virginia Beach, Virginia
Friday, June 4 at 10 a.m.
21st Street and Atlantic Ave (on boardwalk)
Contact: Facebook page for more info and to rsvp to event.

WASHINGTON

Seattle, Washington
Friday, June 4 at 4:30 p.m.
Westlake Park (4th and Pine)
Contact: seattle@seizebp.org

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Filed under ANSWER Coalition, Demonstration Announcements, Environment, fishing, Florida, Gulf Oil Spill, Gulf States, Leftists in the U.S. South, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oil, Southern United States, Tennessee, Texas, Uncategorized, United States, Upcoming Events

Eyewitness Report: BP Oil Flood Protest New Orleans

By hasten_await

At 1:00 pm on May 30, hundreds of protesters gathered in the Washington Artillery Park, known locally as the “amphitheatre,” the performance space across from Jackson Square, next to Cafe Du Monde. The space is directly across the street from New Orleans’ historic St. Louis Cathedral, along the Mississippi riverbank. People from across the state gathered to take part in the BP Oil Flood Protest. They came out despite rain which lasted for a good part of the day, including the entirety of the protest. The event lasted for several hours.

According to the WordPress site set up for the demonstration, the event was organized by “a handful of pissed-off New Orleanians,” not affiliated with any political organization, “to demand immediate, aggressive intervention by the government to stop the BP oil flood.”

Phyllis Montana-Leblanc

Speakers included protest organizers; the famous New Orleans musician, Dr. John; George Barisich, president of the United Commercial Fisherman’s Association; an organizer from the Oily Hair Project (an organization working for the restoration of the Gulf); Phyllis Montana-Leblanc, an African American New Orleans woman featured in Spike Lee’s documentary When the Levees Broke and actress in the HBO series, Treme, which is about post-Katrina New Orleans; along with numerous representatives of local grassroots organizations and ordinary working people from around the city. Many speakers stressed the importance of holding BP accountable for damages and the necessity of transitioning to cleaner energy sources. Several speakers expressed the view that corporations like BP have gotten rich by exploiting the workers and natural resources of the Gulf, but that little of the wealth generated has made it to the masses of working people living in the region. One even suggested that Louisiana is an internal colony of the United States, a statement met by vigorous applause.

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Filed under Corporations, Environment, fishing, Gulf Oil Spill, Gulf States, Louisiana, Southern United States, United States

Urgent: BP Oil Flood Protest – New Orleans

Date: Sunday, May 30, 2010

Time: 1:00PM-7:30PM

Location: Jackson Square, French Quarter, New Orleans

 

Join us on SUNDAY, MAY 30th at 1 PM in Jackson Square, New Orleans, to demand the Federal Government and BP devote all possible available resources to stopping the continued outpouring of crude oil into the waters of the Gulf of Mexico NOW!

Calling for volunteers to help in organization of event; distributing fliers, contacting media, and phone campaign. If you are interested in helping, please send contact info to : bpoilflood@gmail.com
murderedgulf.wordpress.com
Thanks!!

RSVP on Facebook

Check out the blog set up for the campaign

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Filed under class struggle, Corporations, Demonstration Announcements, Environment, fishing, Gulf Oil Spill, Gulf States, Louisiana, Southern United States, Uncategorized, Upcoming Events

Miss. catfish workers may strike

By Sean Schafron

Published May 20, 2010 9:31 PM

Roughly 600 employees of Delta Pride Catfish, Inc., mostly African-American women, may go on strike soon. If the contract the company has offered — using a notorious union-busting legal firm at the negotiating table — is rejected, this would be the second strike against Delta Pride Catfish. The first strike in 1990 is looked upon as a landmark in labor history.

Delta Pride Catfish, a Mississippi company, is paying employees a mere $8 to $9 an hour. They haven’t had an increase in four years.

But that’s not the worst of it.

The company has offered a contract that is atrocious. It would establish a seven-day work week, reduce seniority benefits, eliminate overtime, abolish severance pay should the company close, triple employee contributions to company health insurance over three years, and allow the company to outsource jobs and double the new hire probationary period — among other things. United Food and Commercial Workers Local 1529 has been in contract negotiations with the company for more than a year.

This isn’t the first time the company has received attention for its highly despicable, racist and sexist treatment of Black women employees in the mostly poor Delta region. In 1990 a successful three-month strike took place against the company. The issues then were adverse health effects of speed-up, a five-minute time limit on lavatory use, low wages and 10- to 13-hour workdays.

The strike was the largest of Black workers in Mississippi history and saw the civil rights and labor movements join together. Boycotts were called and scabs were brought in. A company official even threatened a striker with a gun.

The small gains achieved at the time, such as a 75-cent raise, were enough to create a lasting tension between Delta Pride Catfish and its employees.

Although earlier reports suggested a vote on the contract in the third week of May, union representative Leon Sheppard Jr. spoke with Workers World by phone on May 17 and confirmed that a contract ratification vote as well as a strike vote would take place on either May 26 or 27 and that there have been no further negotiations.

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